I cannot count my day complete
'Til needle, thread and fabric meet.
~Author Unknown

Sharing a common thread with those who love the art of hand embroidery

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

You find a beautiful hand stitched dresser scarf at a shop, and you can't believe how cheap the price is.............

 
then you realize it has heavy stains................
but that's okay.........because you remembered reading on my previous posts

that these stains can be removed............
just by mixing baking soda and hydrogen peroxide together into a runny paste..............

moisten the linen with water,
 
rub the paste mixture gently onto the stain............
let it sit over night..............
gently wash the linen........
and the stain is gone!
 
But that is not the only problem with it...............
there is a big hole in it.............
or in this case,
wax dropped onto it and a hole in it where someone unsuccessfully tried to remove the wax.
Not a problem I say...........buy it, take it home, because this too can be repaired and the linen can once again look beautiful and be used in your home.
 
Here is what you can do..............
First, find fabric that matches the stitched piece in color and in texture.
then, pin this piece on the wrong side of the linen, over the hole. Pencil mark a square big enough around the hole.
Baste a running stitch along the pencil outline of the square.
Now turn over the stitched piece to the right side and carefully
cut away the wax............
 
or trim the loose ends of the hole.........
making sure not to cut the patch material underneath.
 
Now turn under a small edge of the hole and work the blind stitch.......just like an applique around the entire hole, using very small stitches.


Now you have a clean patch over this area.


Turn the stitched piece over to the wrong side again..........remove the basting stitches along the square and
cut the excess fabric  away and leave just enough around the stitching of the hole repair.


With tiny stitches, work a closed buttonhole stitch over the raw edges.
This keeps the patch from fraying and balling up with use and washing over the years.
 

Now, turn it over to find that  you have an almost un noticeable patch on this linen
 

and it can now be used



and displayed for many more years in your home.
 I hope you found this tutorial easy to follow and I hope that when you find lost and forgotten beautiful hand stitched pieces that need some care,
you will take them home to enjoy then like they were meant to be!
 








15 comments:

Laurie said...

Thank-you for your tutorial! I have a table cloth that is stained and now I know how to fix it. Your dresser scarf turned out so beautiful.

Lesa said...

Thanks from me, too, for posting such useful information. I can't resist a beautiful piece of needlework at the thrift store, even damaged, and therefore have quite a few pieces that need the help you're shown. I've been known to "rescue" partially finished needlework kits, not only because I love them and know how expensive they were(and are) but because I realize how much effort and, hopefully, fun was worked into the piece by the one who started it. Your shop sounds just wonderful!

Patty H. said...

I love old linens whether they have holes or stains. But good to know how to fix them. Thank you.

lil red hen said...

Kathleen, thank you for posting this procedure again. You may remember I asked you about a scarf I had which was stained. Well, I have finished the embroidery work and am ready to remove the stain, so this was timed perfectly for me. I'll give it a try and let you know how it looks.

Jane S. said...

I'm so glad to see this "how to". I love orphaned linens and always fix them up so that they can be used and enjoyed. :)

ina said...

Thanks for the tutorial.It's really helpful.By the way, Happy New Year!

Simple Living said...

Appreciate your sharing this knowledge...it's a skill that's slowly losing it's way. Thank you for the inspiration:)

Gina E. said...

Well done, Kathleen! I remember my mother showing me how to fix holes in clothing like that.

Chip Butter said...

It seems to me a few holes and patches just add to the value of old linens. My mother patched so many old pieces that I now have and love. Thanks for posting again about stain removal.

Yesteryear Embroideries said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kath said...

Kathleen, thank you so much for posting this wonderfully helpful tip on removing stains and repairing holes in linen. Perhaps you'll consider putting a link on the side for tips on cleaning and repairs like you have for restoration? Regardless, thank you so much. I'll have to remember this the next time I'm looking at a lovely vintage piece that has some damage to it. I can't wait to use your tips.

Melody Brown said...

Hi!
WHat a great tutorial!
I'll give ya a heads up watch for our new party at ECS
Cottage Stitchery. every 1st Wed of the month.

Marie said...

I have used your recipe for removing stains of baking soda and peroxide countless times on my clothing. It's amazing how it doesn't take the color out of the fabric at all but just the stain. Sometimes I have to do it three or four times, and the longer I let the item sit with the paste on it, the better. You have been a lifesaver since I tend to spill everything I eat down my front! :-) Of course I also use it for removing old stains on linens. Love this info on how to patch as well. I needed it.

pbrenner said...

Thank you so much for sharing this repair tutorial - I have several old linens that have been neatly repaired (I love those little patches!), and others that need it. I can't stand throwing out such lovely textiles just because of a little wear and tear. I need to give this a try!

Patty

Joanne said...

Great tips- thanks!