I cannot count my day complete
'Til needle, thread and fabric meet.
~Author Unknown

Sharing a common thread with those who love the art of hand embroidery

Monday, February 5, 2018

I have decided to bring this antique plate into a new life..............

This antique plate is from the C. C. Thompson Company, (USA)
it's pattern name is Madison.
It is  from the 1920s
When I see old plates like this.........they call out to me......."embroider my design!"
I have so many lovely plates in my collection and in
my vintage shop, 

and often customers look at them........but rarely pick them
up to really see them.  They hold so much beauty........
and history..........don't you think so? 

So...........to bring this beauty out to the eye.......
and to give it another life that it is really worthy of...........
I drew up a design and hand embroidered it,



onto  a new dinner napkin..............
to match this lovely plate. 


I designed two napkins, actually, 
because..........I have a plan!

I am currently working on a matching luncheon cloth
to go with it all.  Although I only have one plate..........
and the chances of finding a match are pretty much impossible,
this plate could serve as a serving plate or perhaps someone
can find a mix-match plate to go with it.
When I am finished with the luncheon cloth
this would be a sweet "couples luncheon set" 
for a housewarming or wedding gift.
Giving this lovely old piece a new life!



If you are interested in the history of this wonderful old USA
dishware company, here it is............
The C. C. Thompson Company originated under the name of Thompson & Herbert in 1868. The venture was backed by Josiah Thompson one of the pioneer merchants of the town. Cassius Clark Thompson (born in 1851) was a son of Josiah Thompson and Col. J. T. Herbert had been a crockery salesman for William Brunt, Jr.  Cassius Thompson was a major player in East Liverpool's dominant pottery industry and he was the owner of the prosperous pottery firm. 

About this time B. C. Simms and John C. Thompson came into the firm and it was then known as C. C. Thompson & Company. Cassius Thompson died very suddenly of heart failure, April 24th, 1905, and his son George C. Thompson came into the firm to represent his father's interests. The firm was turned into a stock company and about this time B. C. Simms and John C. Thompson came into the firm and it was then known as C. C. Thompson & Company..
Like many other potteries in the late 1800s, they produced Rockingham and yellow ware and later semi-porcelain dinnerware. It was located along the Ohio River and just to the side of the old Chester Bridge.

In the early 1920s, potteries started replacing their outdated periodic (bottle) kilns with more efficient continuous tunnel kilns. There was a time when a pottery's size was judged on the number of bottle kilns it possessed, both large production and small decorating versions. 
C.C. Thomposon had fourteen.
 The buildings were of the most substantial kind and up to date for that day in the way of equipment. Even though CCT was a larger pottery and lasted until the late 1930s, there is very little of it available to collectors today.
I hope you enjoyed this little walk though  "dishware history"
tell me, is there a plate design ( old or new) that you would love to 
have embroidered linens to match with ?
I would love to hear!!



9 comments:

Debra said...

This is so interesting-and boy do I LOVE your matching napkins! What a lovely idea. Yes, I'd love to have my grandma's teacup pattern on a napkin. They have lovely moss roses on them. They say 'Bond Ware" and 'L&M' on the bottom of the cup. So delicate-the cup is thin-maybe porcelain-I don't know how to tell. I also have the teapot that goes with the cups.

mamasmercantile said...

My goodness what a talent you have. Such a wonderful idea, it certainly would make an amazing gift for any occasion.

happyone said...

Wow that is amazing how you duplicated the design from the plate and made such beautiful napkins.

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

I love designs of roses...in tea cups and embroidery too! You are amazing be able to make the design to embroidery onto the towels! What a talent! And I always get a thrill when I find something Made in the USA! Love reading the history of this company!

Chip Butter said...

Your embroidery is just amazing! It seems there's not a flower you can't reproduce in stitch. What a talent you have!

Sandra said...

Your hand embroidery design on the two cloth napkins really brought the plate back to life. The plate and napkins, along with the table linen would certainly make a wonderful gift. Always a joy to see your newest creations!

Cheryl said...

Beautiful embroidery! You know what you could do.... you could scan a copy of the design and print it out and glue it on the back of a clear glass plate. I've done this with one layer of a beautiful napkin. Google it, there is a lot of different ideas. You could even use paint and paint it on some glass plates so you'd have more than one :-)

letslearnembroidery said...

Really wonderful work.Kudos to you.

Gina E. said...

How clever you are Kathleen! I don't know of anyone else who would think of creating an embroidery design to match a pretty china plate - gorgeous! The history of the pottery company was fascinating; it is so important to keep people aware of the way things were done in the past.